Corea and the Powers: A Review of the Far Eastern Question, with Appendices

Front Cover
"Shanghai Mercury" Office, 1889 - Eastern question (Far East) - 96 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 77 - It has increasingly been the object of the British commercial communities for the past fifty years to open up the Shan States and south-west China to our commerce. As late back as 1829 Lord William Bentinck, and in 1836 Lord Auckland, interested themselves in the question of opening communication with the Shan States and south-western China. In 1861 Sir Arthur Phayre, the first Chief Commissioner of Burmah, recommended the sanction of a survey to Kiang Hung,* and in 1866 Lord. Salisbury, then Viscount...
Page 38 - European melodramatic tone and its suicidal half- knowledge of the very native feeling to which he appealed.* He received an indignant disclaimer from the Sikh Khalsa and the Sikhs generally, who rightly consider themselves as a bulwark in the Punjab against all aggression on British rule. writer may now be, they are curious productions and contain passages which deserve to be known, especially by the English Public. As they were despatched from Russia, it may be presumed that the writer counted...
Page 38 - French protection, so as to enable me to reside at Pondicherry, some months before I quitted Paris. " But that now matters very little, as my destiny his brought me to the feet of my Sovereign the Emperor of Russia, whom I am prepared to serve with my life should he ever desire to employ me in his service. Thanking you from my heart for your kind sympathy towards my countrymen, whom I hope one of these days to deliver as predicted of me in a prophecy written in the year 1725 by the last religious...
Page 77 - Guinea are to be found markets requiring " education " — markets of the future. Valuable as these are, they are altogether dwarfed by the large and lucrative outlet for our trade in Eastern Asia, the most promising to be seen in any part of the world. This latter includes China, Corea, Formosa, Indo-China (including Siam and the Siamese Shan States), Malaya, Upper Burmah, and the Burmese Shan States and Tibet. The others are of secondary importance. Compare these Asian markets with Africa. In Africa...
Page 74 - ... that the decree would be passed without compunction, and that the thing would be done as effectually as it might. It is simply because China has not the power, and does not see her way out of so hazardous a business, that the attempt is not made, and that recourse is had to different expedients. One of the most striking features in the character of the Chinese is the way in which they adapt themselves to circumstances ; and the history of our • relations with them is full of significant proof...
Page 42 - Siberian Railway' right away [sic] to the Pacific is to be commenced at last. . . . The prolongation of the railway now in progress through Ekaterinburg and Tiumen will shortly be met by several other lines, laid across the Siberian plains from the port of Vladivostok. . . . Part of the line is, if possible, to be commenced next spring, and it is estimated that the whole may be completed in about five years. Direct communication will then be established between St. Petersburg and Russia's Pacific...
Page 77 - The great new field for our commerce lies in Eastern Asia, where the markets are ready for immediate development, offering present relief, while in Africa and New Guinea are to be found markets requiring " education
Page 47 - Corea) are as follows : There is a distinct understanding between China and Russia that any action by the latter in Korea will be regarded by the former as a casus belli.
Page 78 - In 1869 the Duke of Argyll sanctioned a survey between Tonghoo and Kiang Hung, if it could be carried out without political complications or undue expenditure. In 1874 Lord Salisbury once more sanctioned a survey to Kiang Hung or some point near it, to use his own words, " both in the interests of England and British Burmah.
Page 40 - Corean official will be present at the time of the departure of the 1'ritish ships. No conditions have been made with the Corean Government ; but Her Majesty's Government did not determine to retire from Port Hamilton till they had received a guarantee that no part of Corea, including Port Hamilton, will be occupied by any Foreign Power. Her Majesty's Government acted under naval advice when they decided to leave Port Hamilton. Papers on the subject will shortly be presented to Parliament.

Bibliographic information