Page images
PDF
EPUB
[graphic][subsumed]

THE WAY IN WHICH SARDINIAN WOOLENS ARE WOVEN

The women of the Mediterranean island are industrious and painstaking. Their flocks supply the necessary wool for the yarn from which are woven many of the costumes shown in Color Plates I to VIII.

RECENT BEQUESTS BY MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY

W

HILE the National Geographic Society depends entirely upon the small annual membership fees of more than a million members, its activities for the increase and diffusion of geographic knowledge appeal so strongly to many individuals that bequests are not infrequently made to further these objects.

Among the most recent of such bequests is that of Mr. George True Nealley, a resident of New York City and for 17 years a member of The Society, who bequeathed one-fourth of his estate, or more than $20,000, to the National Geographic Society; one-half of the estate, or $40,000, was left to Harvard University, and the remaining one-fourth to the National

Academy of Sciences. The Board of Trustees of The Society has set aside the bequest as a separate fund, the interest on which is to be used for purchasing books for The Society's geographic library, and each volume so purchased is to be marked as a memorial to Mr. Nealley.

Miss Abbie M. White, of Grafton, Massachusetts, who was a member of the National Geographic Society for 20 years, recently died, at the age of 70, and bequeathed "to the National Geographic Society of Washington, D. C., in memory of Edward S. Bowen, late of Pawtucket, in the State of Rhode Island, the sum of $15,000, to be used for the purposes of said Society."

926

ver

ead

OSS

int

: ver hes

ew

Dad

ar

ɔn;

ras

of

2).

ses

her

the

ng ta

ng,

ac

th

'er

ige

ely

ith

DE

ng

es,

or

n

he

THE
NATIONAL
GEOGRAPHIC
MAGAZINE

COPYRIGHT. 1926 BY NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY. WASHINGTON D. C.. IN THE UNITED STATES AND GREAT BRITAIN

66

MOTOR-COACHING THROUGH NORTH

CAROLINA

BY MELVILLE CHATER

AUTHOR OF "HISTORY'S GREATEST TREK," "REDISCOVERING THE RHINE," "THROUGH THE BACK DOORS OF FRANCE," ETC., IN THE NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE

"M

ADE to order," in its most complimentary sense, describes Raleigh, capital of North Carolina. The capital's location was chosen by the General Assembly in 1788, and, the National Capital excepted, it is unique in being thus planned and built. A charmingly harmonious result is seen in the wide, oak-shaded streets converging at the statehouse, which rises in sheltering dignity above these namesakes of North Carolina cities (see illustration, page 476).

Of North Carolina's presidential trioJohnson, Polk, and Jackson-the firstnamed was born at Raleigh and there served as a tailor's apprentice.

But a visit to North Carolina should not begin in any such relatively modern. environs as century-and-a-quarter - old Raleigh.

DISCOVERING WILD HORSES AND TAME TERRAPIN

Three months was far too short a time to renew the memories of boyhood while marveling at the changes which have come with the development of hydroelectric power, the extension of the public school system and the diversification of agriculture. The privilege of seeing every corner of North Carolina in that brief period would have been impossible except through the medium of the motor coach, by which the writer traveled for more than 2,000 miles in the State.

A thirty-passenger coach sped us over 157 miles of asphalt road to Morehead City, where a motor boat took us across Bogue Sound to Beaufort. In this quaint port, with its gigantic oaks, prim flower plots, and vistas of rigging, there breathes that ghostly old-wordliness of certain New England fishing villages. And the broad speech, flavored with by-gone idioms, carries one still further back, even to Devon; for Beaufort is the gateway to Hatteras Banks and the 16th-century sea trail of Raleigh's mariners (see map, page 512).

Our discoveries began with wild horses and tame terrapin. We found the former on the near-by Banks, the latter at the U. S. Biological Station at Beaufort.

In addition to marking and releasing terrapin to restock local waters, this station has demonstrated that winter feeding, in contradistinction to hibernation, accelerates by a year the creature's growth to a commercially profitable size. "Br'er Tarrapin" may live to the respectable age of 25 years unless he comes to an untimely though gastronomically glorious end, with a hotel menu as his epitaph.

TRADITION SAYS WILD HORSES ARE DESCENDED FROM RALEIGH'S PONIES

North Carolina's shellfish beds, dotting 1,500 miles of ocean and sound shores. have at times been seriously depleted for lack of uniform laws and systematic enforcement. The near-extinction of the terrapin should point its lesson.

[graphic][subsumed][merged small]

EAST FRONT OF THE STATEHOUSE, RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA From the made-to-order capital of the Tarheel State the author began his motor-coaching tour (see text, page 475).

No biological station has been needed to conserve the wild horses. For centuries they have been roaming on the Banks, and current tradition has it that they are descended from Barbary ponies which were brought over by Sir Walter Raleigh's colonists.*

Our quest landed us on a naked, sun* Additional copies of the supplement, "Boyhood of Sir Walter Raleigh," by Sir John Millais, issued with this number of the NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE, may be obtained, unfolded and printed on special art paper, at 50 cents each.

baked spit where men were driving the socalled "banker ponies" along the beach and into a corral made of timbers from old wrecks. Perched on the pen's top rail, with the beach-pounding surf along one edge of the narrow spit and the sound, with its rough sailboats, on the other, we took lens shots at the inclosed jam of 200 horses, as they reared and kicked each other into a state of bloodied noses and wildly rolling eyes (see page 499).

Some of the herders lassoed and cut out

« PreviousContinue »