Annual Report of the Secretary of War

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1935
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 25 - The Republic of Panama grants to the United States in perpetuity the use, occupation and control of a zone of land and land under water for the construction, maintenance, operation, sanitation and protection...
Page 29 - It is hereby declared to be the policy of Congress to promote, encourage, and develop water transportation, service, and facilities in connection with commerce of the United States, and to foster and preserve in full vigor both rail and water transportation.
Page 69 - Training Corps and the Citizens' Military Training Camps to fulfill their functions as sources of trained personnel will be enhanced.
Page 75 - ... shall draw interest at the rate of three per centum per annum, which shall be paid quarterly to the treasurer of the Home ; and the proceeds of such registered bonds, as they are paid, shall be deposited in like manner. No part of the principal sum so deposited shall be withdrawn for use except upon a resolution of the Board of Commissioners stating the necessity and approved by the Secretary of War.
Page 73 - War for transmittal to Congress, a full statement of the financial and other affairs of the Home. BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS The government and control of the United States Soldiers...
Page 83 - ... inclusive, or as a student at service schools, other than those of the noncombatant branches, at any time, shall be regarded as satisfying the requirements of service with combatant arms. Existing laws in so far as they restrict the detail or assignment of officers are hereby repealed. The...
Page 24 - Whatever highway may be constructed across the barrier dividing the two greatest maritime areas of the world must be for the world's benefit, a trust for mankind, to be removed from the chance of domination by any single power, nor become a point of invitation for hostilities or a prize for warlike ambition.
Page 68 - The successes of that amazing leader, beside which the triumphs of most other commanders in history pale into insignificance, are proof sufficient of his unerring instinct for the fundamental qualifications of an army. He devised an organization appropriate to conditions then existing; he raised the discipline and the morale of his troops to a level never known in any other army, unless possibly that of Cromwell; he spent every available period of peace to develop subordinate leaders and to produce...
Page 68 - I effaced from the pages of history, and were the facts of his campaigns preserved in descriptive detail, the soldier would still possess a mine of untold wealth from which to extract nuggets of knowledge useful in molding an army for future use.
Page 39 - For the first time since 1922 the Army enters a new fiscal year with a reasonable prospect of developing itself into a defense establishment commensurate in size and efficiency to the country's minimum needs.

Bibliographic information