The Sewanee Review, Volume 18

Front Cover
University of the South, 1910 - American fiction
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 470 - Property does become clothed with a public interest when used in a manner to make it of public consequence, and affect the community at large.
Page 281 - The dew shall weep thy fall to-night ; For thou must die. Sweet Rose, whose hue, angry and brave, Bids the rash gazer wipe his eye, Thy root is ever in its grave, And thou must die.
Page 280 - No more! — I will abroad. What! shall I ever sigh and pine? My lines and life are free — free as the road, Loose as the wind, as large as store. Shall I be still in suit? Have I no harvest but a thorn To let me blood, and not restore What I have lost with cordial fruit?
Page 139 - Whenever I read a book or a passage that particularly pleased me, in which a thing was said or an effect rendered with propriety, in which there was either some conspicuous force or some happy distinction in the style, I must sit down at once and set myself to ape that quality.
Page 303 - Wives, submit yourselves unto your own husbands, as unto the Lord. For the husband is the head of the wife, even as Christ is the head of the church: and he is the savior of the body.
Page 277 - As larks, harmoniously, And sing this day thy victories : 'Then shall the fall further the flight in me.
Page 39 - He rather prays you will be pleased to see One such, today, as other plays should be; Where neither chorus wafts you o'er the seas, Nor creaking throne comes down the boys to please, Nor nimble squib is seen to make afeard The gentlewomen, nor rolled bullet heard To say it thunders, nor tempestuous drum Rumbles to tell you when the storm doth come...
Page 419 - Thou sure and firm-set earth, Hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear Thy very stones prate of my whereabout, And take the present horror from the time Which now suits with it.
Page 275 - The Sundays of man's life, Threaded together on time's string, Make bracelets to adorn the wife Of the eternal glorious King. On Sunday heaven's gate stands ope ; Blessings are plentiful and rife — More plentiful than hope.
Page 397 - When, indeed, men speak of Beauty, they mean, precisely, not a quality, as is supposed, but an effect — they refer, in short, just to that intense and pure elevation of soul — not of intellect, or of heart— upon which I have commented, and which is experienced in consequence of contemplating

Bibliographic information