Nigeria’s University Age: Reframing Decolonisation and Development

Front Cover
Springer, Nov 13, 2017 - History - 285 pages

This book explores the world of Nigerian universities to offer an innovative perspective on the history of development and decolonisation from the 1930s to the 1960s. Using political, cultural and spatial approaches, the book shows that Nigerians and foreign donors alike saw the nation’s new universities as vital institutions: a means to educate future national leaders, drive economic growth, and make a modern Nigeria. Universities were vibrant places, centres of nightlife, dance, and the construction of spectacular buildings, as well as teaching and research. At universities, students, scholars, visionaries, and rebels considered and contested colonialism, the global Cold War, and the future of Nigeria. University life was shaped by, and formative to, experiences of development and decolonisation. The book will be of interest to historians of Africa, empire, education, architecture, and the Cold War.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Nigerias University Age
1
Universities and the West African Roots
19
University College Ibadan
41
Architecture and Decolonisation
65
Student Culture Everyday Life
89
Nigerian Universities 6
119
University Development and the Nigerian
145
Conclusion
173
Bibliography
235
Index
273
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2017)

Tim Livsey is Departmental Lecturer in African History at the University of Oxford, UK.

Bibliographic information